News & Events

Summer, MAY 2017

Parliament, Persuasion & People

Information Session (choose one):

  • NOON Wednesday, September 28
  • NOON Wednesday, October 12
  • Room 342 Moudy S

May 15 – June 5:  Applications through the TCU Study Abroad office will open October 8, 2015.

APPLY ONLINE! This button will become active in early October.

studyabroadmay17Travel with the department of communication studies to London and Scotland and study persuasion and Parliamentary debate while experiencing the amazing British culture. Course visits include behind-the-scenes tour of the Houses of Parliament as well as one-on-one meetings with sitting members of British Parliament. Class visits include BBC, British Library, British Museum, Scottish Parliament and more! Cultural visits include high tea at The Savoy, excursion to Scotland, dinner at The Witchery, and more!

Course Details: May 15 – 19, 2017. Mandatory on-campus classroom instruction.

May 21 – June 5, 2017. Travel component.

A three-day weekend is built into the program to allow students time for independent exploration and travel.

Students can earn up to six hours of credit by participating in one or both of the following courses:

COMM 30123: Parliamentary Debate: Explore the British origins of contemporary Parliamentary debate and decision-making while observing first-hand debates at the Houses of Parliament and Scottish Parliament. Also, perform live debates at some of the British Isles’ most celebrated and historic locations.

COMM 31223: Persuasion in the Global Community: Study and experience persuasion in a variety of realms, from messages sent between individuals across cultures to the persuasive discourse of global leaders. Students will view live political sessions, visit sites of historical importance, review key historic speech texts, and engage with elected representatives to learn about key global issues.

Faculty: Carrie Moore and Debi Iba


Students Study Intercultural Communication in RussiaIn March 2016 a select handful of TCU students traveled to Russia with their Intercultural Communication class for Spring Break. The trip, led by Professors Moore and IbDSC02125a as well as TCU Study Abroad Coordinator Jessica Severson, was the first of its kind where students studied Intercultural Communication in the classroom during a traditional semester, then explored course concepts first hand by traveling to a culture different from their own. During the trip, the students engaged in weekly class meetings while visiting a variety of attractions in St. Petersburg and Moscow. Some of their most favorite sites included the Kremlin, the Hermitage Museum, and the location of the Siege of Leningrad, the Red Square, and a Russian ballet. The group worked closely with St. Petersburg University. Russian students accompanied them during their outings to help them learn about Russian culture. This was a great opportunity for students to gain knowledge on the political and cultural history of Russia with a reoccurring theme of ethical peace. Students shared their experience at the Russia Global Academy Showcase with others on campus in April. The Communication department plans to offer this unique course with the travel component to Russia again in spring 2017.

TCU Comm Students in RussiaDSC02159

 


New! Changes Declaring a Comm Studies Major and BS Degree RequirementsStarting Fall 2016, students may declare a degree in Communication Studies at any time.  Required courses remain: COMM 10123 (Communicating Effectively), 20113 (Interpersonal), 20223 (Theory), and 30163 (Organizational). Additionally:

  • B.S. degree requires Statistics (specifically either MATH 10043 or INSC 20153).
  • Statistics (MATH 10043 or INSC 20153) is now a prerequisite to many upper division COMM classes. Click here for a list of COMM Courses and Prerequisites. Click here for a complete list of classes that do not require Statistics as a prerequisite. It may be helpful for you to complete some of these COMM courses while you working to complete the Statistics requirement for the Communication Studies B. S. major.

*All of the changes listed above apply ONLY to Communication Studies majors seeking a B.S. degree and declaring a major in Communication Studies after the Summer 2016.  If you have any questions about course prerequisites, enrollments, or degree requirements, please see your advisor or Dr. Melissa Schroeder, the Communication Studies Department Chair.


TCU Students take home 1st and 2nd place in the 91st Battle of the Flowers
The 91st annual Battle of the Flowers competition took place on Friday, February 26, 2016 at the Witte Museum in San Antonio. Five TCU Communication students completed in the event. The event is held annually with its main focus on Texas history and is the oldest university and college-level competition in the state of Texas. Topics centered on the Faces of Texas Independence. 
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Not only did our very own TCU students make it to the final round, but they also took home 1st and 2nd place. John Biebighauser was awarded 1st place along with a $3,000 scholarship. Additionally, he will be deliver his speech at the annual Fiesta Luncheon at the Tobin Center for the Performing Arts and ride in the Fiesta Parade the following day. Stephanie Milligan was awarded 2nd place along with a $1,500 scholarship. Congratulations to both our winners! 
 

 

Dr. Paul Schrodt will present as a part of TCU’s 2016 Last Lecture Series

Paul Schrodt

Dr. Paul Schrodt

Dr. Schrodt was selected by the 2016 senior class along with three other TCU professors to share one last message of encouragement and wisdom with the senior class in their last semester before graduation.

In his presentation entitled “Forgive and Forget or Forgetting to Forgive? Relational Transgressions and the Communication of Forgiveness to Reconcile Broken Relationships” he will discuss relational transgressions, what constitutes true forgiveness, and the role of forgiveness in maintaining one’s personal and relational health.

The lecture will be held on March 3rd at 6 p.m. in the BLUU Ballroom. All members of the TCU community are welcome to attend.

 

 


 

TCU vs. Japanese Debaters

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East meets West in an upcoming debate hosted by the TCU Forensics Team. The team is excited to welcome Masaya Sasaki and Naruhiko Nakano, national champion debaters from Japan.In a two-on-two parliamentary- style debate, members of the TCU team will face-off against the Japanese debaters on a resolution of global energy policy. The event is sponsored by the Academy of Tomorrow and the Bob Schieffer College of Communication.Members of the community are encouraged to join us on Thursday, February 25, at 7 p.m. for a public debate. It will be hosted in the Mary Couts Burnett Library Reading Room at TCU.Meet the debatersMasayaSasaki-300x300Masayak Sasaki is a second-year debater on the parliamentary-style debate team at the University of Tokyo Debating Society. Although he had no previous experience in debating, he has won many prizes in national and international debate tournaments. Most recently, he was a Semi-Finalist at the English Speaking Union of Japan national tournament 2015 and at the Asian Debate Institute tournament 2015. Sasaki said that above all, he loves debating. He loves speaking in public, especially in English.Picture-of-Naru-3-300x289Naruhiko Nakano is on the policy debate team at Mie University E.S.S. He started the policy debate two and a half years ago, in his first year at the university. During his junior year he won the first team prize from NDAJ X FIDL tournament that decided the strongest team in western Japan. After that, he became the eighth debater and got the eighth team prize from the National debate tournament. Now he supports small teams as a member of NAFA, the largest and best-known debate organization in Japan. He said he loves debating and wants to improve his debate skills further.Colten Meisner and Shelby Whitson will represent the TCU Forensics Team for the public debate.
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Colten Meisner is a third year student at Texas Christian University, where he studies in the Bob Schieffer College of Communication and the John V. Roach Honors College. Colten has over seven years of experience in competitive debate and public address. During his time with TCU Forensics, Colten has garnered national awards in extemporaneous speaking and impromptu speaking and has won several invitational titles in parliamentary debate. Colten is a member of Pi Kappa Delta and competes at a national level for both the American Forensic Association and the National Forensic Association.
Whitson
Shelby Whitson is the Vice President of TCU Forensics. She will graduate in May with a major in political science and minor in journalism. In her third year competing with the team Shelby participates in a myriad of events. She is consistently awarded top speaker in Parliamentary Debate at invitational tournaments across the country. She has also experienced success in the events of extemporaneous speaking and impromptu speaking. In addition to forensics, Shelby is the politics & public affairs editor for the109 news in Fort Worth, the communications executive for the TCU Young Americans for Freedom, the academics chair for TX Delta Pi Beta Phi and the associate producer and broadcaster for a news show on 88.7 The Choice. Shelby is a member of the Political Science honor society, Pi Sigma Delta, the communications honor society Lambda Pi Eta, and the Pi Kappa Delta debate society.Members of TCU’s faculty and staff are also welcome to join us in the Scharbauer Hall Debate Chamber on Wednesday, February 24, at 11:30 a.m. for a private debate. Please RSVP to a.hinderaker@tcu.edu for this event.Debaters for this afternoon debate will be Colten Meisner and Timothy Betts.BettsTimothy Betts is a Junior pursuing a Philosophy and Economics double degree here at TCU. Timothy is also the President and Extemporaneous Speaking Chairperson for the TCU Forensics team and a member of the John V. Roach Honors College. As a member of the TCU Forensics team he has won numerous awards including Superior and Excellent awards at the 2015 Pi Kappa Delta National Convention and a number of individual tournament champion awards. Timothy typically competes in Extemporaneous Speaking, Impromptu Speaking, Informative, After Dinner Speaking, Poetry and Program Oral Interpretation, and Rhetorical Criticism.

Naruhiko Nakano is on the policy debate team at Mie University E.S.S. He started the policy debate two and a half years ago, in his first year at the university. During his junior year he won the first team prize from NDAJ X FIDL tournament that decided the strongest team in western Japan. After that, he became the eighth debater and got the eighth team prize from the National debate tournament. Now he supports small teams as a member of NAFA, the largest and best-known debate organization in Japan. He said he loves debating and wants to improve his debate skills further.Masayak Sasaki is a second-year debater on the parliamentary-style debate team at the University of Tokyo Debating Society. Although he had no previous experience in debating, he has won many prizes in national and international debate tournaments. Most recently, he was a Semi-Finalist at the English Speaking Union of Japan national tournament 2015 and at the Asian Debate Institute tournament 2015. Sasaki said that above all, he loves debating. He loves speaking in public, especially in English.

 


 

Adam Richards wins prestigious NCA award for outstanding doctoral dissertation

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Dr. Adam Richards

Adam Richards, assistant professor in the Department of Communication Studies, is one of the 2014 recipients of the Gerald R. Miller Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation Award from the National Communication Association (NCA). 

The award is given annually to recognize new scholars who completed outstanding dissertations during the previous academic year. Richards was recognized for his dissertation, completed at University of Maryland, entitled “Survival of the Persuasible: An Evolutionary Approach to Interpersonal Influence.”

He will be presented with his award during the 100th Annual Convention of the NCA, which will be held in Chicago November 21-23.

“The Communication discipline has a long tradition of exceptional scholarship,” said Nancy Kidd, NCA’s executive director. “We’re proud to recognize Dr. Richards’s contributions with this well-deserved award.”

The NCA is the largest communication association in the United States, serving the scholars, teachers, and practitioners who are its members by enabling and supporting their professional interests in research and teaching.

 


 

Paul Schrodt’s research on “the silent treatment” featured in Wall Street Journal

At some point in their lives, most people have probably been the receiver – or the giver — of the infamous “silent treatment.” It’s generally acknowledged that this type of communication

Illustration courtesy of the Wall Street Journal

Illustration courtesy of the Wall Street Journal

shutdown isn’t the best way to deal with a problem, but according to research by communication studies professor Paul Schrodt, it’s even more detrimental than most people may think.

Schrodt’s findings, along with those of other communication scholars across the nation, were recently the subject of the Wall Street Journal article “How and Why to Ban the Silent Treatment from Your Relationship.” (Read the article here).

The silent treatment is part of what researchers call the “demand-withdrawal” pattern. According to the WSJ article, “It happens when one partner repeatedly approaches the other with a request, whether asking for attention or change—or giving criticism—and is met with avoidance or silence.”

Schrodt and colleagues conducted an analysis of 74 studies involving more than 14,000 participants. The findings, which were published in the March 2014  Communication Monographs, showed that the demand-withdraw pattern is one of the most damaging types of relationship conflict. It’s also one of the the hardest patterns to break.

According to Schrodt, who was lead researcher in the analysis, both partners have a hand in the silent treatment — yet each blames the other. The person making the demands feels shut out and that his or her emotional needs are being neglected; conversely, the person withdrawing feels nagged.

But there is hope. Schrodt advises that becoming aware of the pattern is the first step in breaking the demand-withdrawal cycle. Each partner should consider his or her role in the cycle and the other person’s viewpoint, then talk it out.

At TCU, Schrodt teaches courses on interpersonal communication, family communication and conflict resolution. An avid researcher, his work has published in more than 60 articles in leading communication journals.

Read the Wall Street Journal article here.

 


 

Professor to receive top NCA award

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Dr. Andrew Ledbetter

Andrew Ledbetter will receive the Early Career Award at the National Communication Association (NCA) Conference in Chicago this fall. Given by the Interpersonal Communication Division of the NCA, the Early Career Award is one of the field’s most prestigious honors and is awarded to a young scholar in his or her first eight years of academia. The scholar must be an individual “whose body of work has made a significant contribution to knowledge of interpersonal
communication and shows promise for continued impact.”

Ledbetter’s research focuses on how relational partners maintain their interpersonal relationships using technology, specifically social media,instant messaging and online video games. Along with Em Griffin and Glenn Sparks, Ledbetter is coauthor of the best-selling textbook A First Look at Communication Theory, currently in its 9th edition, and has published more than 35 articles in several leading peer-reviewed journals.He received his bachelor’s from Wheaton College and his master’s and doctorate degrees from the University of Kansas.

“I am honored to have my scholarship recognized as among the best in the field of interpersonal communication,” said Ledbetter. “I’m especially grateful to the mentors and students who have encouraged and inspired my research. My
hope is that receiving this award will further enable me to explore the
large and subtle changes technology brings to our close relationships.”

 


 

IMG_5097_cropCongrats, grads!

 

Graduating students were honored in TCU’s Student Veterans Honor Cord Ceremony on Thursday, May 8 in Robert Carr Chapel.  Congratulations to Bill Howe, Stephen Rockhold, and Darreck Lanier!

 

 


 

Short and sweet speeches lessen audience anxiety

The fear of public speaking (glossophobia) is one of the most common of all phobias. Nightmares of forgotten lines, lost notes and fumbled words can cause even the most confident people to wake up in a cold sweat. But while the adrenaline rush that comes with giving a speech is common knowledge, people often don’t realize that audience members can experience anxiety, too.

Paul King, professor and department chair of communication studies, calls this phenomenon “anxiety in listening performance.” His research shows that the level of anxiety correlates to speech length – the longer the speaker talks, the more listeners feel they need to remember. That translates to increased pressure on the audience’s brains, creating a “cognitive backlog” of information that causes minds to tire and tune out.

Paul King

Paul King, Department Chair

“As more and more stuff you need to remember piles on, it creates greater and greater pressure, and pretty soon you’re going to drop it all,” explains King.

Bestselling author and communication coach Carmine Gallo has recently quoted King’s views on anxiety listening performance in articles on Forbes and Inc., as well as his new book, Talk Like TED: The 9 Public-Speaking Secrets of the World’s Top Minds.

-See more at http://newsevents.tcu.edu/stories/short-and-sweet-speeches-lessen-audience-anxiety/